Satellite tracking, July to October 2011

In the summer of 2011, five young storks were equipped with satellite transmitters in Switzerland in order to verify what significance the disposal sites really have for the Swiss storks. Unfortunately, three of the storks equipped with transmitters dropped out as early as August and September 2011. The maps with location changes for the individual storks were up-dated on a regular basis and can be looked at under the menue point “Satellite tracking” or the following links:

>> Bruno
>> Dani
>> Amelios
>> Düschess
>> Sämi

Stork “Bruno”:
In Spain, rest at various disposal sites for several days each time. At the beginning of October, arrival in Morocco; there, close to the city of Kenitra, north of Rabat, stay on a disposal site. Last position data on 10.10.2011. Probably malfunction of the transmitter (technical defect?).

Stork “Dani”:
Migration through France and over the eastern edge of the Pyrenees. Throughout September and until 10.10.2011, stay at the disposal site Montoliu close to Lerida. On 11th October, continuation of his flight to Zaragoza in the Ebro valley; stay there at a large disposal site as well.

Stork “Amelios”:
Migration through France and over the eastern edge of the Pyrenees. Last position data at the end of August 2011, just south of the French-Spanish border. Probably malfunction of the transmitter (technical defect?)

Stork “Düschess”:
As early as four weeks after being equipped with a transmitter, on 4th August 2011, the bird was found dead close to the location where it had been fitted with the transmitter.

Stork “Sämi”:
During his migration through Spain, rest at various disposal sites, for several days each time. Beginning of October, crossing Strait of Gibraltar and speedy continuation of his flight through Morocco to the south. At present (20.10.2011) in border area Mauritania/Senegal, close to the Senegal river. 

Despite the breakdown so far of three transmitters, the results achieved by satellite tracking now already confirm the importance of waste disposal sites on the western migration route. The three transmitting storks that flew through Spain, in a sense, “brachiated through” from disposal site to disposal site in a southern direction. There were longer stays almost only at disposal sites. Apart from the already known and above-mentioned disposal sites, we were able to detect further disposal sites by means of the GPS co-ordinates of the birds. The rice fields by the Guadalquivir have again proved to be an important feeding site, as was the case back in 2000 and 2001. 

By now, there are thousands of precise pieces of information on location, the detailed evaluation of which supplied many insights on migration behaviour, habitat selection, range of activity, etc.

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